Interactive Maps

Monitor interactive maps present treaty status, stockpiles, contamination, and casualties data on landmines and cluster munitions, primarily based on the latest Monitor annual reports. (Please see more information at the bottom of the page.)


Toggle the "Landmines | Cluster Munitions" box on bottom left as well as the "Treaty Status | Stockpiles | Contamination | Casualties" box on bottom right to switch between interactive maps. Move the cursor over a country (or other area) to display additional information. Click to be taken to the relevant country profile. Click, hold and drag to move the map. Use the zoom feature to make larger and smaller. The Monitor also produces a series of static maps (landmine maps, cluster munition maps).

Country Status
Rollover country to view details \ Click and drag to navigate map
Sources
Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor
and ongoing public updates

Information regarding interactive maps.

LANDMINES

Treaty Status map is continually updated to indicate when states ratify or accede to the Mine Ban Treaty. When scrolling over a country, additional information is provided as to what date a state has signed, ratified or acceded to the treaty, and when it enters into force for it. For the purposes of the Monitor, a state is considered a full State Party when it ratifies or accedes (or takes similar binding action), although officially the treaty enters into force for a country on the first day of the sixth month after such an action. Because "other areas" cannot become states parties, they are black in this map. The Monitor currently publishes profiles on the following other areas: Abkhazia, Falkland Islands/Malvinas, Kosovo, Nagorno-Karabakh, Somaliland, Taiwan, and Western Sahara.

Stockpiles map indicates whether a state or other area has completely destroyed its landmine stockpile, still has a stockpile, or never had a stockpile (indicated by "no stockpile"). When scrolling over a state or other area, additional information indicates a States Party's 4-year stockpile destruction deadline, or "NA" when not a State Party. The total stockpile destroyed and remaining are also indicated, when such information is available. This data is typically, but not always, based on transparency reports submitted by States Parties. This data is also generally updated once a year, except when states announce stockpile destruction completion outside of annual States Parties meetings. The field for "date of last update" indicates when the Monitor last compiled stockpile data for that country/area. Stockpiles retaining for training and other purposes permitted by the Mine Ban Treaty are not included in this data.

Contamination map indicates whether a country or other area is now or has been contaminated by landmines, and an estimation of that contamination when possible. Those countries that have completed clearance are indicated in green. Remaining contamination is indicated in ranges from unclear, to light (less than 5 square kilometers in the entire country/other area), medium (5-19 square kilometers), heavy (20-99 square kilometers) and massive (more than 100 square kilometers). “Unclear” typically indicates there is contamination but no reliable estimate is available. In some cases, contamination is massive. However, the following countries with residual/suspected contamination are also labelled as unclear: Cameroon, Djibouti, Moldova, Namibia, Philippines, and Tunisia.

When scrolling over a state or other area, additional information indicates a States Party's 10-year clearance deadline or extended deadline, or is left blank when not a State Party. Data often relies, in part, on transparency reports submitted by States Parties and is generally updated once a year, except when states announce clearance completion at annual States Parties meetings or via other mechanisms. The field for "date of last update" indicates when the Monitor last compiled clearance data for that country/area.

The Monitor acknowledges the contributions of the Mine Action Review (www.mineactionreview.org), which has conducted the mine action research in 2017, including on survey and clearance, and shared all its resulting landmine and cluster munition reports with the Monitor. The Monitor is responsible for the findings presented online and in its print publications.

Casualties map indicates the total number of casualties -- individuals injured or killed -- by victim-activated antipersonnel landmines, cluster munition remnants, and other explosive remnants of war during 1999-2015. The map is coded by ranges (0, 1-100, 101-1000, and more than 1000) and the exact number recorded by the Monitor is available when the cursor is moved over the country or area. Additional information also includes whether the country is party to the Mine Ban Treaty and the number of survivors all time (up to the end of 2015), again by ranges (none, less than 100 or no reliable estimate, 100-999, 1000-4999, 5000-20000, or more than 20000). Due to Monitor efforts to validate records, we anticipate the actual casualty and survivor totals are higher as many casualties go unrecorded or are inaccurately reported. Monitor data is typically updated near the end of each calendar year, revising earlier years and adding the prior year. The period for the displayed data is indicated in the pop-up information. Data sources typically include official transparency reports as well as media accounts. This is NOT a map of annual casualties.  

CLUSTER MUNITIONS

Treaty Status map is continually updated to indicate when states ratify or accede to the Convention on Cluster Munitions. When scrolling over a country, additional information is provided as to what date a state has signed, ratified or acceded to the treaty, and when it enters into force for it. For the purposes of the Monitor, a state is considered a full State Party when it ratifies or accedes (or takes similar binding action), although officially the treaty enters into force for a country on the first day of the sixth month after such an action. Because "other areas" cannot become states parties, they are black in this map. The Monitor currently publishes profiles on the following other areas: Abkhazia, Falkland Islands/Malvinas, Kosovo, Nagorno-Karabakh, Somaliland, Taiwan, and Western Sahara.

Stockpiles map indicates whether a state or other area has completely destroyed its cluster munition and submunition stockpile, still has a stockpile, or never had a stockpile (indicated by "no stockpile"). When scrolling over a state or other area, additional information indicates a States Party's 8-year stockpile destruction deadline, or "NA" when not a State Party or completion has occurred. The total stockpile destroyed and remaining are also indicated, when such information is available. Values are given first for munitions and then for submunitions, with a "/" between the figures. This data is typically, but not always, based on transparency reports submitted by States Parties. This data is also generally updated once a year, except when states announce stockpile destruction completion outside of annual States Parties meetings. The field for "date of last update" indicates when the Monitor last compiled stockpile data for that country/area. Stockpiles retaining for training and other purposes permitted by the Convention on Cluster Munitions are not included in this data.

Contamination map indicates whether a country or other area is now or has been contaminated by cluster munition remnants, and an estimation of that contamination when possible. Those countries that have completed clearance are indicated in green. Remaining contamination is indicated in ranges from unclear, to light (less than 5 square kilometers in the entire country/other area), medium (5-99 square kilometers), heavy (100-999 square kilometers) and massive (more than 1,000 square kilometers). “Unclear” typically indicates that it is not clear whether cluster munition contamination exists. Contamination has been marked as "unclear" but the country is contaminated at a light or medium level (extent is not known) in Angola, Azerbaijan, Chad, Georgia, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Tajikistan.

When scrolling over a state or other area, additional information indicates a States Party's 10-year clearance deadline, or is left blank when not a State Party or there is no contamination. Data often relies, in part, on transparency reports submitted by States Parties and is generally updated once a year, except when states announce clearance completion at annual States Parties meetings or via other mechanisms. The field for "date of last update" indicates when the Monitor last compiled clearance data for that country/area.

The Monitor acknowledges the contributions of the Mine Action Review (www.mineactionreview.org), which has conducted the mine action research in 2017, including on survey and clearance, and shared all its resulting landmine and cluster munition reports with the Monitor. The Monitor is responsible for the findings presented online and in its print publications.

Casualties map indicates whether any casualties -- individuals injured or killed -- have been recorded at any time through the end of 2016 due to cluster munition strikes or remnants, with a darker shading for the seven countries most impacted by these weapons (Afghanistan, Cambodia, Iraq, Lao PDR, Lebanon, Syria, and Vietnam). Additional information indicates whether the country is party to the Convention on Cluster Munitions, the exact number of recorded casualties and whether they are due to cluster munition strikes (at the time of weapons use) or to later explosiion of cluster munition remnants. The period for the displayed data is also indicated in the pop-up information. Data sources typically include official transparency reports as well as media accounts, and are updated generally around the middle of each calendar year, revising earlier years and adding the prior year. In areas of active conflict, such as reently in Syria and Yemen, it is often difficult to confirm casualty reports and we suspect that actual casualties may be much higher. This is NOT a map of annual casualties.