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Casualties and Victim Assistance

Last updated: 22 November 2013

Casualties

Casualties in 2009

Casualties in 2009

22 (2008: 11)

Casualties by outcome

4 killed; 18 injured (2008: 11 injured)

Casualties by device type

4 antipersonnel mines; 14 antivehicle mines; 4 ERW

 

The Azerbaijan National Agency for Mine Action (ANAMA) reported 22 mine/explosive remnants of war (ERW) casualties in 16 incidents in 2009. All casualties were male. Four men were killed, another 17 were injured, and one child was injured. Four casualties were military personnel (three killed and one injured).[1] This represents an increase from the 11 people injured by mines/ERW in 2008 as reported by ANAMA.[2]

As in past years, in 2009 the casualty data collected by the Azerbaijan Campaign to Ban Landmines (AzCBL) differed from that of ANAMA in methodology and results. AzCBL reported 34 mine/ERW casualties in Azerbaijan for 2009.[3] This represented an increase from the 23 mine/ERW casualties (one person killed and 22 injured) reported by AzCBL for 2008.[4]

As of the end of 2009, ANAMA reported a total of 2,360 mine/ERW casualties (363 people killed and 1,997 injured) in Azerbaijan since the early 1990s.[5]

Victim Assistance

In 2009, there were at least 1,839 mine/ERW survivors known to be living in Azerbaijan.[6] Efforts to assists survivors through state and NGO services continued without significant change in 2009.

Survivor needs

The Azerbaijan Red Crescent Society (AzRCS) collected and shared data on mine/ERW survivors of incidents occurring in 2009 for use in victim assistance activities by ANAMA/Azerbaijan Mine Victim Association (AMVA) and other NGOs under ANAMA administration.[7] ANAMA continued to use and update information from the 2004 mine survivors’ needs assessment survey for both project planning and implementation purposes.[8] AzCBL used its own sources in addition to ANAMA data to plan and implement victim assistance activities.[9]

Victim assistance coordination[10]

Government coordinating body/ focal point

ANAMA: Fundraised for victim assistance services; implemented programs for mine/ERW survivors; managed the AMVA

Coordinating mechanism

Mine Victim Assistance Working Group: ANAMA held several coordination meetings including national NGOs, the AzRCS and other relevant organizations to address challenges and develop plans

Plan

Mine Victim Assistance Strategic Plan: The 2004 plan was revised in 2008 and was under review in 2009

 

In 2009 ANAMA coordinated victim assistance activities in accordance with the Mine Victim Assistance Strategic Plan and prepared future projects.[11] In late 2009, ANAMA expressed the need for the enhancement of victim assistance coordination by expanding community involvement and incorporating community monitoring and advocacy activities.[12]

The Ministry of Labor and Social Protection of Population (MLSPP) and the Ministry of Health are responsible for protecting the rights of persons with disabilities more generally.[13]

Survivor inclusion

Mine/ERW survivors are included in planning and implementation of victim assistance through the AMVA.[14] Mine survivors collect information and implement projects of the AzCBL.[15]

Service accessibility and effectiveness

Victim assistance activities in 2009[16]

Name of organization

Type of organization

Type of activity

Changes in quality/coverage of service in 2009

MLSPP

Government

Rehabilitation and prostheses

Decrease in prosthetics production

Rehabilitation Center of Invalids of the Republic in Baku/MLSPP

Government

Rehabilitation, diagnostic, and psychosocial support

Two-thirds decrease in the number of survivors assisted

AzRCS

National NGO

Social support to families of mine casualties

One family received support

AzCBL

National NGO

Economic inclusion: microfinance projects; legal awareness for mine/ERW survivors and families

More than 50% increase in the number of beneficiaries

ANAMA/AMVA

Government/National NGOs

Provided services through national NGOs including micro-credit, wheelchairs, and equipment

Additional wheelchairs distributed to survivors in need; other activities ongoing (as below)

Chirag Humanitarian Development Public Union /International Organization for Migration (IOM)/International Trust Fund for Demining and Mine Victims Assistance (ITF)

National NGO/International organization

Micro-credit and small business training in six districts

97% repayment rate for micro-credit loans in 2009; the program continued and expanded

The Social and Psychological Rehabilitation Center of the Youth – “Dirchelish”/ANAMA

National NGO

Equal opportunities in employment and education for young mine survivors

More mine survivors received education opportunities than in 2008

Ojag Humanitarian Union

National NGO

Economic inclusion: training and business planning by Ganja City Regional Resource Center

Project trainees graduated in 2009 and received job placements; additional equipment was supplied

 

No significant changes in the quality of services were reported for 2009 and most programs continued from the previous year.

Overall, prosthetic and rehabilitation services to mine/ERW survivors decreased in 2009. Three of the four MLSPP-run rehabilitation centers provided fewer services. The three centers formerly supported by the ICRC reported the smallest reduction in services: the Ahmedly Prosthetic Orthopedic Rehabilitation Center in Baku decreased outputs for survivors by some 16%;[17] the Nakhichivan satellite center provided less than half the number of prostheses for mine/ERW survivors;[18] and the center in the mine-affected area of Ganja increased its assistance to mine/ERW survivors slightly.[19] The Rehabilitation Center of Invalids of the Republic in Baku, which assists the largest number of mine/ERW survivors, provided services to fewer survivors in 2009 than 2008. However, the number of survivors assisted was consistent with years prior to 2008. There was no progress in addressing the training and infrastructure needs identified by the center in early 2009.[20]

In 2009, there continued to be few mental health institutions in conflict-affected districts offering specific services to mine/ERW survivors and other people with disabilities.[21]

In 2009, NGOs increased the level of economic inclusion and education services for mine/ERW survivors provided through local projects with donor support, though economic inclusion remained a significant need. The local NGO Chirag Humanitarian Development Public Union began the second phase of its micro-credit program with new beneficiaries.[22] AzCBL significantly increased the number of mine/ERW survivor beneficiaries as well as its assistance to family members of victims.[23]

While the law prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in employment, education, access to health care, and the provision of other state services, discrimination in employment remained a problem.[24]

Azerbaijan ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol on 28 January 2009.



[1] ANAMA, “Mine /UXO Victims Reported,” Monthly Report February 2009, www.anama.baku.az; ANAMA, “Mine /UXO Victims Reported,” Monthly Report January 2010, www.anama.gov.az; interview with Vagif Sadigov, Mine Risk Education Assistant, ANAMA, Baku, 17 March 2010; and data provided by email from Imran Safaraliyev, Mine Victim Assistance Officer, ANAMA, 21 May 2010.

[2] ANAMA, “Mine /UXO Victims Reported,” Monthly Report February 2009, www.anama.baku.az; and ANAMA, “Mine /UXO Victims Reported,” Monthly Report January 2010, www.anama.gov.az. Landmine Monitor Report 2009 recorded ANAMA’s report of three mine/ERW casualties (all injured) for 2008. Data provided by email from Murad Rahimov, Information Manager, Information Department, ANAMA, 3 July 2009; 9 July 2009; 13 July 2009; and 14 July 2009.

[3] AzCBL collects casualty information from governmental sources, regional coordinators, and elsewhere. Of the 24 civilian casualties, one was killed and 23 were injured; in addition four soldiers were killed and six were injured. Antipersonnel mines caused 13 casualties, antivehicle mines eight, and ERW 11. Email from Hafiz Safikhanov, Director, AzCBL, 13 January 2010.

[4] Email from Hafiz Safikhanov, Director, AzCBL, 23 June 2009.

[5] ANAMA, Monthly Report January 2010, p. 3, www.anama.baku.az.

[6] ANAMA, “Mine Victim Assistance, one of the pillars of the Humanitarian Mine Action,” www.anama.gov.az. The total was calculated by ANAMA through victim assistance projects and cross checking of the casualty database.

[7] Email from Bayram Valiyev, Weapon Contamination Advisor, AzRCS, 12 March 2010.

[8] ANAMA, “Mine Victim Assistance, one of the pillars of the Humanitarian Mine Action,” www.anama.gov.az.

[9] Email from Hafiz Safikhanov, AzCBL, 31 March 2010.

[10] ANAMA, “Mine Victim Assistance, one of the pillars of the Humanitarian Mine Action,” www.anama.gov.az; and email from Imran Safaraliyev, Mine Victim Assistance Officer, ANAMA, 21 May 2010.

[11] Responses to Monitor questionnaire by Imran Safaraliyev, ANAMA, 22 June 2009 and 21 May 2010.

[12] UN, “2010 Portfolio of Mine Action Projects,” New York, November 2009, p. 38.

[13] US Department of State, “2009 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Azerbaijan,” Washington, DC, 11 March 2010.

[14] ANAMA, “Mine Victim Assistance, one of the pillars of the Humanitarian Mine Action,” www.anama.gov.az. See also Nick Nwolisa, International Eurasia Press Fund, “Azerbaijan Mine Victim Association: The Story So Far,” Journal of Mine Action, Issue 12.1, Summer 2008, maic.jmu.edu.

[15] Email from Hafiz Safikhanov, AzCBL, 31 March 2010.

[16] Interview with Abdulla Abdullayev, Deputy Director, Ahmedly Prosthetic Orthopedic Rehabilitation Center, Baku, 16 March 2010; telephone interview with Mubariz Rustamli, Nakhichivan Prosthetic and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Center, 17 March 2010; interview with Ilham Bagirov, Director, Ahmedly Prosthetic Orthopedic Rehabilitation Center, Baku, 17 March 2010; interview with Seadat Mahmudova, Head Physician, Rehabilitation Center of Invalids of the Republic, Baku, 16 March 2010; IOM Azerbaijan, “Socio-Economic Reintegration Programme for Mine Victims in Azerbaijan,” iom.az; email from Hafiz Safikhanov, AzCBL, 31 March 2010; ITF, “Annual Report 2009”, Ljubljana, 2010, pp. 79–80; telephone interview with Islam Bakhshaliyev, Director, Dirchelish, 30 March 2010; email from Bayram Valiyev, AzRCS, 12 March 2010; and email from Imran Safaraliyev, ANAMA, 21 May 2010.

[17] Interview with Abdulla Abdullayev, Ahmedly Prosthetic Orthopedic Rehabilitation Center, Baku, 16 March 2010.

[18] Telephone interview with Mubariz Rustamli, Nakhichivan Prosthetic and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Center, 17 March 2010.

[19] Interview with Ilham Bagirov, Ahmedly Prosthetic Orthopedic Rehabilitation Center, Baku, 17 March 2010.

[20] These needs included providing training of medical staff, wheelchairs and functional hospital beds, and expanding the center from its 50-bed capacity in 2009 by adding up to 150 beds. Interviews with Seadat Mahmudova, Rehabilitation Center of Invalids of the Republic, Baku, 16 March 2009 and 16 March 2010.

[21] UN, “2010 Portfolio of Mine Action Projects,” New York, November 2009, p. 41.

[22] IOM Azerbaijan, “Socio-Economic Reintegration Programme for Mine Victims in Azerbaijan,” om.az. The project was supported by the IOM, ITF, and ANAMA.

[23] Email from Hafiz Safikhanov, AzCBL, 31 March 2010.

[24] US Department of State, “2009 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Azerbaijan,” Washington, DC, 11 March 2010.