Bahamas

Cluster Munition Ban Policy

Last updated: 05 July 2017

Summary: Non-signatory the Bahamas has never made a public statement on its policy on joining the convention, but its representatives indicated in October 2016 that the government is working to accede to the convention. The Bahamas has never attended a meeting of the convention and is not known to have used, produced, transferred, or stockpiled cluster munitions.

Policy

The Commonwealth of the Bahamas has not acceded to the Convention on Cluster Munitions.

In October 2016, representatives from the Bahamas told the Cluster Munition Coalition that the government is working to accede to the convention and sees no objections to joining.[1] The Bahamas has not provided an expected timetable for its accession to the convention.

The Bahamas did not participate in the Oslo Process that created the convention in 2008 and it has never attended a meeting on cluster munitions.

The Bahamas has never made a statement articulating its views on banning cluster munitions, but its representatives have responded to correspondence from campaigners.[2]

The Bahamas voted in favor of a UN General Assembly (UNGA) resolution on the Convention on Cluster Munitions in December 2016, which urges states outside the convention to “join as soon as possible.”[3]

It has also voted in favor of UNGA resolutions that express outrage at the use of cluster munitions in Syria, most recently in December 2016.[4]

The Bahamas is party to the Mine Ban Treaty. It has not joined the Convention on Conventional Weapons.

Use, production, transfer, and stockpiling

The Bahamas is not known to have used, produced, transferred, or stockpiled cluster munitions.



[1] ICBL-CMC meeting with the delegation of the Bahamas to UNGA First Committee on Disarmament and International Security, New York, October 2016.

[2] For example, in an August 2015 letter the country’s representative to Canada thanked CMC member Mines Action Canada for inviting the Bahamas to accede to the convention. Letter to Paul Hannon, Executive Director, Mines Action Canada, from Roselyn Horton, High Commission for the Bahamas, Ottawa, 25 August 2015.

[3]Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 71/45, 5 December 2016. It supported the first UNGA resolution on the convention a year earlier. “Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 70/54, 7 December 2015.

[4]Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic,” UNGA Resolution 71/203, 19 December 2016. The Bahamas voted in favor of similar resolutions in 2014–2015.


Mine Ban Policy

Last updated: 05 October 2012

The Commonwealth of the Bahamas signed the Mine Ban Treaty on 3 December 1997 and ratified it on 31 July 1998, becoming a State Party on 1 March 1999. The Bahamas has never used, produced, imported, exported, or stockpiled antipersonnel mines, including for training purposes. The Bahamas has not enacted new legislation specifically to implement the Mine Ban Treaty. The Bahamas last submitted a Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 report in 2009.

The Bahamas did not attend any Mine Ban Treaty meetings in 2011 or the first half of 2012.

The Bahamas is not party to the Convention on Conventional Weapons.