Brunei Daressalam

Cluster Munition Ban Policy

Last updated: 11 July 2017

Summary: Non-signatory Brunei has not commented on its position on accession to the convention. It voted in favor of key UN resolutions on the convention in 2016 and 2015. Brunei participated in a meeting of the convention once, in 2010. It is not known to have used, produced, or transferred cluster munitions, while a government representative said in 2010 that Brunei does not possess cluster munitions.

Policy

Negara Brunei Darussalam has not acceded to the Convention on Cluster Munitions.

Brunei has never made a public statement elaborating its position on joining the convention.[1]

Brunei participated in several meetings of the Oslo Process that created the convention and joined in the consensus adoption of the convention in Dublin on 30 May 2008. Brunei did not, however, attend the convention’s Signing Conference in Oslo in December 2008.[2]

Brunei participated as an observer in the convention’s First Meeting of States Parties in Vientiane, Lao PDR, in November 2010. This remains its only attendance at a meeting of the convention.

In December 2016, Brunei voted in favor of a key UN General Assembly (UNGA) resolution, which urges states outside the Convention on Cluster Munitions to “o vention on Cluster Muni”[3] Brunei voted in favor of the first UNGA resolution on the convention in December 2015.[4]

Brunei is a State Party to the Mine Ban Treaty. It is not party to the Convention on Conventional Weapons.

Use, production, transfer, and stockpiling

Brunei is not known to have used, produced, or transferred cluster munitions. In 2010, a government representative said that Brunei does not possess a stockpile of cluster munitions.[5]



[1] In November 2010, a government representative said that Brunei was reviewing the convention. Interview and Cluster Munition Coalition meeting with Sahrun Haji Hashim, Senior Legal Officer, Legal Unit, Ministry of Defense, in Vientiane, 10 November 2010.

[2] For details on Brunei’s policy and practice regarding cluster munitions through early 2010, see ICBL, Cluster Munition Monitor 2010 (Ottawa: Mines Action Canada, October 2010), p. 201.

[3]Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 71/45, 5 December 2016.

[4]Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 70/54, 7 December 2015.

[5] Interview with Sahrun Haji Hashim, Ministry of Defense, in Vientiane, 10 November 2010.

Mine Ban Policy

Last updated: 27 October 2011

Brunei Darussalam signed the Mine Ban Treaty on 4 December 1997 and ratified it on 24 April 2006, becoming a State Party on 1 October 2006. Brunei has never used, produced, imported, exported, or stockpiled antipersonnel mines, including for training purposes. Legislation to enforce the antipersonnel mine prohibition domestically has been drafted, but not yet enacted.[1] Brunei has not submitted a Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 report since April 2007. On 22 June 2010, Brunei submitted a letter to the UN in lieu of an Article 7 report that stated it does “not have any Anti-Personnel Mines that are banned under the Convention, and therefore we do not have any information for the Article 7 Annual Report.”[2]

Brunei is not party to the Convention on Conventional Weapons.

Brunei did not attend any Mine Ban Treaty meetings in 2010 or the first half in 2011.

 



[1] Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for unspecified period ending April 2007), Form A.

[2] Letter from Amb. Janin Erih, Permanent Mission of Brunei to the UN in Geneva, 22 June 2010.