Central African Republic

Cluster Munition Ban Policy

Last updated: 26 June 2018

Summary: Signatory the Central African Republic has stated since 2013 that internal armed conflict has prevented it from ratifying the convention. It has participated in meetings of the convention, but not since 2014. The Central African Republic states that it has never used, produced, or exported cluster munitions and that it has destroyed stocks of cluster munitions.

Policy

The Central African Republicsigned the Convention on Cluster Munitions on 3 December 2008.

The current status of ratification is not known. Previously, in 2013, government representatives told the CMC that internal armed conflict had prevented ratification of the convention from proceeding.[1] Before 2013, government officials said the country’s ratification of the convention was pending.[2]

The Central African Republic participated in a regional meeting (in Kampala, Uganda in September 2008) of the diplomatic Oslo Process that created the convention.[3]

The Central African Republic participated in Meetings of States Parties of the convention until 2014. It was invited to but did not attend the convention’s Seventh Meeting of States Parties in Geneva in September 2017. It participated in a regional workshop on cluster munitions in Lomé, Togo in May 2013.

In December 2017, the Central African Republic was absent from the vote on a key UN General Assembly (UNGA) resolution that urges states outside the convention to “join as soon as possible.”[4] It voted in favor of previous UNGA resolutions on the convention in 2015 and 2016.[5]

The Central African Republic has voted in favor of UNGA resolutions expressing outrage at the use of cluster munitions in Syria, most recently in December 2017.[6]

The Central African Republic is a State Party to the Mine Ban Treaty. It is not party to the Convention on Conventional Weapons.

Use, production, transfer, and stockpiling

The Central African Republic has stated that it has never used, produced, or transferred cluster munitions and that it is not affected by cluster munition remnants.[7]

In 2011, the Central African Republic informed States Parties that it had destroyed a considerable stockpile of cluster munitions.[8] A government representative subsequently clarified that the cluster munitions were recovered from a non-state armed group operating within the country.[9]



[1] CMC meeting with Désiré Laurent Malibangar, Coordinator, Ministry of Defense, Lomé, 22 May 2013. The Central African Republic delegation to the Convention on Cluster Munitions Fourth Meeting of States Parties in September 2013 also informed the CMC that ratification had been delayed by conflict.

[2] Statement of the Central African Republic, Accra Regional Conference on the Universalization of the Convention on Cluster Munitions, Accra, 28 May 2012; and statement of the Central African Republic, Convention on Cluster Munitions Second Meeting of States Parties, Beirut, 14 September 2011.

[3] For details on the Central African Republic’s cluster munition policy and practice up to early 2009, see Human Rights Watch and Landmine Action, Banning Cluster Munitions: Government Policy and Practice (Ottawa: Mines Action Canada, May 2009), p. 55.

[4] “Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 72/54, 4 December 2017.

[5]Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 71/45, 5 December 2016; and “Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 70/54, 7 December 2015.

[6]Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic,” UNGA Resolution 72/191, 19 December 2017. The Central African Republic voted in favor of similar resolutions in 2013–2016.

[7] Statement by Antoine Gambi, Ministry of Defense, Convention on Cluster Munitions Signing Conference, Oslo, 4 December 2008. Notes by Landmine Action.

[8] Statement of the Central African Republic, Convention on Cluster Munitions Second Meeting of States Parties, Beirut, 14 September 2011.

[9] CMC meeting with Désiré Laurent Malibangar, Chargé de Mission, Ministry of Defense, Accra, 29 May 2012.