Jordan

Cluster Munition Ban Policy

Last updated: 26 June 2018

Summary: Non-signatory Jordan says it supports the convention, but it has not taken any steps to join it. Jordan has participated in several meetings of the convention, but not since 2012. It voted in favor of a key United Nations (UN) resolution on the convention in December 2017.

Jordan is not known to have used or produced cluster munitions, but it has imported them and is believed to possess a stockpile.

Policy

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has not acceded to the Convention on Cluster Munitions.

Jordan has expressed its support for the convention and its interest in joining on several occasions, but has not taken any steps towards accession. Jordan’s last statement on the matter was in September 2012, when Prince Mired Ben Raad Zeid al-Hussein informed States Parties that “We realize and appreciate the importance of the Convention on Cluster Munitions even though we are not yet a State Party. Hopefully circumstances will change some time in the not too distant future and we will be able to join.”[1] Prince Mired, who has served as special envoy for the Mine Ban Treaty, informed States Parties in 2010 that Jordan supports the convention “from the sidelines” and has “yet to decide if and when we can join.”[2]

Jordan participated in two meetings of the Oslo Process that created the Convention on Cluster Munitions, but did not attend the formal negotiations in Dublin in May 2008, even as an observer.[3] Jordan attended an international conference on cluster munitions in Santiago, Chile in June 2010.

Jordan participated as an observer in the convention’s Meetings of States Parties in 2010–2012. It was invited to, but did not attend, the Seventh Meeting of States Parties to the convention in Geneva in September 2017.

In December 2017, Jordan voted in favor of a UN General Assembly (UNGA) resolution that calls on states outside the Convention on Cluster Munitions to “join as soon as possible.”[4] Jordan voted in favor of previous resolutions promoting the convention in 2015 and 2016.

As a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council (UNSC), Jordan expressed concern at the use of cluster munitions in eastern Ukraine in 2014, describing the use of “such internationally prohibited weapons” as “a violation of the provisions of international law and a dangerous development that imperils the lives of citizens.”[5] It voted in favor of a 2015 UNSC resolution that expressed concern over evidence of cluster munition use in Darfur, Sudan.[6] Jordan has also voted in favor of UNGA resolutions expressing outrage at the use of cluster munitions in Syria, most recently in December 2017.[7]

Jordan is a State Party to the Mine Ban Treaty. It is also a party to the Convention on Conventional Weapons.

Production, transfer, and stockpiling

Jordan is not known to have produced or exported cluster munitions, but it imported them and possesses a stockpile.

Jordan has not disclosed information on the types and quantities of its stockpiled cluster munitions.

According to United States (US) export records, Jordan imported 200 CBU-71 and 150 Rockeye cluster bombs at some point between 1970 and 1995.[8] The US also transferred 31,704 artillery projectiles (M509A1, M483) containing more than 3 million dual-purpose improved conventional munition (DPICM) submunitions to Jordan in 1995.[9] Jordan reportedly possesses Hydra-70 air-to-surface unguided rocket system, but it is not known if the ammunition types available to it include the M261 Multi-Purpose Submunition rocket.[10]

Use

Jordan is not known to have used cluster munitions.

Since March 2015, Jordan has participated in a Saudi-led joint military operation in Yemen against Houthi forces, also known as Ansar Allah, which has used cluster munitions. Jordan has not commented on evidence that the Saudi-led coalition has used cluster munitions in Yemen, while a December 2016 statement by the coalition forces did not deny the use of cluster munitions and argued that “international law does not ban their use.”[11]



[1] Statement by Prince Mired Ben Raad Zeid al-Hussein of Jordan, Convention on Cluster Munitions Third Meeting of States Parties, Oslo, 11 September 2012. Notes by the CMC.

[2] Statement by Prince Mired of Jordan, Convention on Cluster Munitions First Meeting of States Parties, Vientiane, 10 November 2010. Notes by the CMC.

[3] For more details on Jordan’s policy and practice regarding cluster munitions through early 2009, see Human Rights Watch and Landmine Action, Banning Cluster Munitions: Government Policy and Practice (Ottawa: Mines Action Canada, May 2009), pp. 215–216.

[4]Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 72/54, 4 December 2017.

[5]Provisional Report of the 7287th meeting of the UN Security Council,” S/PV.7287, 24 October 2014, pp. 12–13.

[7]Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic,” UNGA Resolution 72/191, 19 December 2017. Jordan voted in favor of similar resolutions in 2013–2016.

[8] US Defense Security Cooperation Agency, “Cluster Bomb Exports under FMS, FY1970–FY1995,” undated.

[9] US Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense, “Excess Defense Article database,” undated.

[10] Colin King, ed., Jane’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal 2007–2008, CD-edition, 15 January 2008 (Surrey, UK: Jane’s Information Group Limited, 2008).

[11] “International law does not ban the use of cluster munitions. Some States have undertaken a commitment to refrain from using cluster munitions by becoming party to the 2008 Convention on Cluster Munitions. Neither the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia nor its Coalition partners are State Parties to the 2008 Convention, and accordingly, the Coalition’s use of cluster munitions does not violate the obligations of these States under international law.” See, “Coalition Forces supporting legitimacy in Yemen confirm that all Coalition countries aren't members to the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” Saudi Press Agency, 19 December 2016.


Mine Ban Policy

Last updated: 31 October 2011

Commitment to the Mine Ban Treaty

Mine Ban Treaty status

State Party

National implementation measures

National Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Law enacted 1 April 2008

Transparency reporting

30 April 2011

Policy

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan signed the Mine Ban Treaty on 11 August 1998, ratified on 13 November 1998, and became a State Party on 1 May 1999. On 1 April 2008, Jordan enacted the National Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Law, which incorporated the treaty into Jordan’s domestic law.[1]

Jordan submitted its fourteenth Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 report, dated 30 April 2011, covering the period from 30 April 2010 to 20 March 2011.

Jordan attended the Tenth Meeting of States Parties to the Mine Ban Treaty in Geneva in November–December 2010 and made statements on mine clearance, cooperation and assistance, victim assistance, and universalization. Jordan also attended the intersessional Standing Committee meetings in June 2011, where it made statements on mine clearance and universalization and provided an update on victim assistance.

Jordan’s Prince Mired Raad Zeid Al-Hussein has continued to play an important leadership role in promoting the treaty. He served as chair of the board of the National Committee for Demining and Rehabilitation (NCDR) and president of the Eighth Meeting of States Parties in November 2007. He was also appointed to serve as Special Envoy on Universalization of the Mine Ban Treaty in 2010 and 2011.[2]

Jordan is party to the Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW) and its Amended Protocol II on landmines. It submitted its annual report as required under Article 13 covering the period from 1 September 2010 to 31 December 2010. It had not submitted an annual report since 2006. Jordan is not party to CCW Protocol V on explosive remnants of war.

Production, use, stockpile destruction, and retention

Jordan never produced or exported antipersonnel mines, and last used them in 1978. It completed the destruction of its stockpile of 92,342 antipersonnel mines in April 2003. It included Claymore mines in its stockpile destruction.

In April 2011, Jordan reported that it retained 850 antipersonnel mines for training purposes.[3]  This is 50 fewer than reported the previous year.

 



[1] NCDR, “The Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Law: Law Number 10 for the year 2008,” Amman, April 2008, www.ncdr.org.jo. For more details see Landmine Monitor Report 2008, p. 459.

[2] At the intersessional Standing Committee meetings in June 2011, Prince Mired provided a report on his activities, including meetings held in Seoul with government officials of the Republic of Korea and members of the Korean Campaign to Ban Landmines and the Korean Red Cross Society. Statement of Jordan, Standing Committee on the  General Status and Operation of the Convention, Mine Ban Treaty, 20 June 2011.

[3] Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report, Form D, 30 April 2011. It also reported that 50 mines were transferred for training purposes, but it is unclear how this total relates to the 850 total.


Mine Action

Last updated: 05 November 2018

 

Treaty status

Mine Ban Treaty

State Party
Article 5 deadline: 1 March 2012
Needs to request an extension

Mine action management

National mine action management actors

National Committee for Demining and Land Reclamation (NCDR)

Mine action strategic plan

2015–2020 National Plan

Operators in 2017

Jordanian Armed Forces’ Royal Engineering Corps (REC)
NCDR

Extent of contamination as of end 2017

Landmines

4.35kmrequires verification for missing mines
Extent of contamination: light

Cluster munition remnants

None

Other ERW contamination

Extent not reported

Land release in 2017

Landmines

1.44kmverified and released. 75 antipersonnel mines and 2 antivehicle mines destroyed

Other ERW

None

Progress

Landmines

The sampling and verification project in the Jordan Valley was completed in June 2018. Jordan reported that the military had “checked” the areas in the northern borders for military use. Once security conditions allow, the NCDR plans to check whether any quality control of earlier clearance is still needed, in order to determine whether Jordan has fulfilled its Article 5 obligations

Notes: ERW = explosive remnants of war.

Contamination

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is contaminated by mines and ERW. Contamination is primarily the result of the 1948 partition of Palestine, the 1967 Arab-Israeli conflict, the 1970 civil war, and the 1975 confrontation with Syria. Military training ranges and cross-border smuggling have added to the ERW problem.

Jordan declared that it had fulfilled its Article 5 clearance obligations on 24 April 2012, having determined that no areas under its jurisdiction or control remained in which antipersonnel mines were known or suspected.[1]

However, in formally declaring completion of its Article
5 obligations at the Twelfth Meeting of States Partiesin December 2012, Jordan noted that: “While all mined areas that Jordan had made every effort to identify
were cleared by 24 April 2012, Jordan, as a responsible State Party, has proceeded with verification efforts in
two parts of the country, with these verification efforts having resulted in the discovery of additional mined areas.”[2] This pertains first to the need for verification in the Jordan Valley, as earlier clearance by the Jordanian Armed Forces’ Royal Engineering Corps (REC) did not comply with national and international standards and was not subject to quality control;[3] and second to verification that is needed along Jordan’s northern border with Syria, due to a considerable discrepancy (estimated to be more than 10,000 mines[4]) between the recorded number of emplaced mines and the number actually cleared. Most of the difference in the figures is thought to be due to the migration of mines outside identified areas due to flooding and terrain fluctuations, detonations,[5] and unrecorded clearance operations by the army or by smugglers.[6]

As of the end of 2017, the total area in need of verification for missing mines was just under 4.25km2, across a total of 56 areas. This comprised 1.4kmacross 36 areas in the Jordan Valley and 2.8kmacross 18 areas in the norther borders.[7] In September 2018, the NCDR reported that the sampling and verification project in the Jordan Valley had been completed in June 2018. Furthermore, the Jordanian military had reportedly “checked” the areas in the northern borders for military use and further quality control (QC) by the NCDR may not be required in this region. Once security conditions on the Syrian border allow, the NCDR plans to check the work of the Jordanian military and determine if any further action is required. The NCDR’s operations in the north remained suspended as of October 2018, due to the ongoing Syrian crisis.[8]

Program Management

TheNCDR’s board of directors includes representatives of the Jordanian armed forces, the government, NGOs, landmine survivors, and the media.[9] The NCDR is responsible for coordinating, accrediting, regulating, and quality-assuring all mine action organizations, as well as for fundraising.[10] It is also responsible for ensuring mine action is integrated into the country’s wider development strategies.[11]

Strategic planning

The NCDR’s current 2015–2020 National Plan aimed to verify, sample, and release the remaining 5.4kmin the Jordan Valley within 36 months (by the end of 2017), by deploying six manual clearance teams and one mechanical demining team at a projected cost of US$2 million.[12] In April 2017, the NCDR reported that it was not on target to complete verification of the Jordan Valley by the end of the year, and that it would update its work plan in 2018.[13] As mentioned above, verification was reported to have been completed in June 2018. In addition, the Jordanian military had reportedly “checked” the areas in the northern borders for military use and the NCDR planned to check this work once security conditions allowed.[14]

The plan also aimed to eliminate all ERW contamination by 2017.[15] As of September 2018, ERW clearance had not yet started, due to a lack of funding.[16] The NCDR prioritizes areas in need of development for verification.[17]

In addition, Jordan’s national plan reports that the NCDR will transition from a national institution focusing largely on its own mine clearance, to one that will concentrate on assisting other conflict-affected countries to overcome the challenges of mine action and ERW removal.[18]

Operators

The verification and demining operations in Jordan are conducted by the NCDR and REC. Since October 2015, Jordan has deployed four operational teams, totaling 35 deminers.[19] From January 2018, capacity was reduced to three operational teams.[20] According to the NCDR, a shortage of funds prevents it from deploying mechanical assets and mine detection dogs (MDDs) in its Jordan Valley operations.[21]

Land Release

Survey and clearance in 2017

In 2017, Jordan verified and released just under 1.44kmof land, across 38 areas in the Jordan Valley, during which 75 antipersonnel mines (72 M14 mines and 3 M35 mines) and two antivehicle mines were destroyed.[22] This represents a slight increase on the 1.36kmverified and released in 2016.[23]

Article 5 Compliance

Jordan still has outstanding Article 5 survey and clearance obligations.

Jordan declared completion of its Article 5 obligations on 24 April 2012, just ahead of its 1 May 2012 convention deadline, in accordance with the three-year extension request granted by States Parties in 2008. It submitted its formal declaration of completion to the Twelfth Meeting of States Parties in December 2012.[24] On announcing completion, however, Prince Mired acknowledged that “a residual risk could remain in areas where landmines have been emplaced,”[25] and noted that verification efforts had resulted in the discovery of additional mined areas.[26]

With verification of the Jordan Valley completed, as of October 2018, the NCDR needs to confirm whether any quality control of earlier clearance is needed on the northern borders, once security conditions allow, in order to determine whether Jordan has fulfilled its obligations under Article 5.

In the last five years Jordan has verified and released just over 5kmof mined area (see table below).

Mine clearance in 2013–2017

Year

Area cleared (km2)

2017

1.44

2016

1.36

2015

0.65

2014

0.55

2013

1.10

Total

5.1

 

 

The Monitor acknowledges the contributions of the Mine Action Review (www.mineactionreview.org), which has conducted the primary mine action research in 2018 and shared all its country-level landmine reports (from “Clearing the Mines 2018”) and country-level cluster munition reports (from “Clearing Cluster Munition Remnants 2018”) with the Monitor. The Monitor is responsible for the findings presented online and in its print publications.


[1] Declaration by Jordan of Completion of Implementation of Article 5, Mine Ban Treaty Twelfth Meeting of States Parties, 3–7 December 2012 (hereafter, Mine Ban Treaty Article 5 Declaration of Completion, 2012).

[2] Mine Ban Treaty Article 5 Declaration of Completion, 2012.

[3] Statement of Jordan, Mine Ban Treaty Sixteenth Meeting of States Parties, Vienna, December 2017.

[4] Email from Mikael Bold, then Programme Manager, Norwegian People’s Aid (NPA), 12 February 2012. NPA estimated the number of mines missing from the mine belt at between 9,345 and 10,083.

[5] Mine Ban Treaty Article 5 Declaration of Completion, 2012; and statement of Jordan, Mine Ban Treaty Sixteenth Meeting of States Parties, Vienna, December 2017.

[6] Email from Mikael Bold, NPA, 12 February 2012.

[7] Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2017), Form D; and email from Mohammad Breikat, National Director, NCDR, 14 April 2018.

[8] Emails from Mohammad Breikat, NCDR, 30 September and 7 October 2018.

[9] NCDR, “Jordan’s National Mine Action Plan 2005–2009,” Amman, June 2005, pp. 1–2.

[10] Ibid.

[11] Email from Muna Alalul, NCDR, 31 July 2011.

[12] NCDR, “2015–2020 NCDR National Plan,” Amman, undated.

[13] Email from Mohammad Breikat, NCDR, 10 April 2017.

[14] Ibid., 30 September and 7 October 2018.

[15] Ibid.

[16] Ibid., NCDR, 30 September 2018.

[17] Ibid., NCDR, 14 April 2018.

[18] NCDR, “2015–2020 NCDR National Plan,” Amman, undated.

[19] Emails from Mohammad Breikat, NCDR, 25 August 2016, 10 April 2017, and 14 April 2018.

[20] Ibid., 14 April 2018.

[21] Ibid., 30 September 2018.

[22] Ibid., 14 April 2018; and Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2017), Form D.

[23] Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2016), p. 4; and email from Mohammad Breikat, NCDR, 10 April 2017.

[24] Mine Ban Treaty Article 5 Declaration of Completion, 2012.

[25] UNDP, “Jordan becomes the first Middle Eastern country free of all known landmines,” Press release, 24 April 2012.

[26] Mine Ban Treaty Article 5 Declaration of Completion, 2012.


Support for Mine Action

Last updated: 19 November 2018

In 2017, international contributions toward mine action in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan totaled nearly US$600,000.[1]

Jordan officially declared completion of its Article 5 obligations in April 2012, but also acknowledged that a residual risk remained.[2]

 

International government contributions: 2017[3]

Donor

Sector

Amount

(national currency)

Amount (US$)

United States

Various

$400,000

400,000

Czech Republic

Capacity-building

€90,000

101,709

Slovenia

Risk education

€80,065

90,481

Total

 

 

592,190

 

In 2013–2017, Jordan received more than $4 million in international assistance for mine action. International funding has gradually declined from more than $8 million in 2010 to less than $600,000 in 2017.

 

Summary of contributions: 2013–2017[4]

Year

International contribution ($)

2017

592,190

2016

498,541

2015

572,124

2014

262,595

2013

2,381,774

Total

4,307,224

 



[1] Czech Republic, Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report, Form I, 27 March 2018; ITF Enhancing Human Security, Annual Report 2017, March 2018, p. 24; and email from Katherine Baker, Foreign Affairs Officer, Weapons Removal and Abatement, United States (US) Department of State, 8 October 2018.

[2] For more information on Jordan’s progress regarding its verification efforts, see: Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor, “Country Profile: Jordan: Mine Action,” last updated 5 November 2018.

[3] Average exchange rate for 2017: €1=US$1. 13012. US Federal Reserve, “List of Exchange Rates (Annual),” 11 January 2018.

[4] See previous Monitor reports.


Last updated: 26 June 2018

 

Casualties[1]

All known mine/unexploded remnants of war (ERW) casualties (between 1948 and 2017)

950 casualties: 122 killed; 799 injured; 29 unknown

 

The last known mine/ERW casualties in Jordan were in 2011, when six casualties were recorded.[2]

The National Committee for Demining and Rehabilitation (NCDR) has recorded 950 mine/ERW casualties (122 killed; 799 injured; 29 unknown) since 1948.[3]



[1] Casualty data for 2017 is based on an email from Mohammad Breikat, National Director, The National Committee for Demining and Rehabilitation (NCDR), 7 March 2018.

[2] Casualty data and statistics for the period 2000 to 2013 provided by Adnan Telfah, NCDR, 10 March 2014. Between 2000 and 2013, 67 casualties were caused by antipersonnel mines, while 61 were caused by ERW.

[3] Email from Adnan Telfah, NCDR, June 2012; and casualty data and statistics for the period 2000 to 2013 provided by Adnan Telfah, NCDR, 10 March 2014.


Victim Assistance

Last updated: 10 October 2018

Victim assistance action points

  • Improve rehabilitation centers and provide adequate training to staff.
  • Ensure the full implementation of the new law on the rights of persons with disabilities.
  • Ensure mine/explosive remnants of war (ERW) survivors’ full access to medical insurance, quality rehabilitation care, and services as identified in the 2015–2020 Mine Action Plan.
  • Ensure regular maintenance and repair of mine/ERW survivors’ assistive devices, especially for refugees.
  • Develop national prosthetic and orthotic standards as identified in the 2015–2020 Mine Action Plan.

Victim assistance planning and coordination

Government focal point

Higher Council for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (HCD)[1]

Coordination mechanisms

Steering Committee on Survivor and Victim Assistance, chaired by the HCD[2]

Plans/strategies

Victim assistance is included in the National Mine Action Plan 2015–2020[3]

Disability sector integration

The HCD also serves as the focal point for the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD).[4] Victim assistance is integrated into the National Disability Strategy[5]

Survivor inclusion and participation

Survivors are included in the Steering Committee on Survivor and Victim Assistance. The HCD includes representatives of persons with disabilities

Reporting (Article 7 and statements)

Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2017), Form G

Statement delivered at Mine Ban Treaty 16th Meeting of States Parties in Vienna, in December 2017

 

International commitments and obligations

Jordan is responsible for a significant number of landmine/ERW survivors who are in need: 799 recorded[6]

Mine Ban Treaty

Yes

Convention on Cluster Munitions

No

Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCW) Protocol V

No

Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

Yes

 

Laws and policies

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan’s national legislation prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability,[7] but such legal protections were not upheld.[8] In 2017, there was a 76% unemployment rate among persons with disabilities.[9] The National Building Law (No. 7 of 1993), which provides for accessibility standards, lacked implementation.[10] A 10-year national plan was being developed in 2018 to facilitate access to buildings and public services.[11]

Major Developments in 2017–2018

The Law on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities No. 20 for the Year 2017 entered into force on 30 August 2017. Under the new law, Jordanian citizens with disabilities are eligible for an identification card, which includes information about their disability. The identification card gives them access to a number of services, such as a health insurance card covering medical and rehabilitation services. The law also guarantees employment quotas, access to education, and access to public facilities.[12] According to the new law, the Social Development Ministry will be responsible of providing services to persons with disabilities in place of the NCD.[13]


Emergency, continuing, physical medical rehabilitation; prosthetics and mobility devices; psychological

The influx of Syrian refugees strains Jordanian public services and resources.[14] In 2017, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) strengthened the capacity of local medical service providers to respond to emergencies by providing materials, equipment, and training.[15] A joint program of the ICRC, the University of Jordan, and the Ministry of Health was launched in 2017 to improve teaching in physical rehabilitation.[16]

Médecins sans Frontières(MSF) Amman reconstructive surgery hospital, originally set up to treat war-wounded Iraqis, now admits patients from Syria, Libya, Yemen, and Palestine.[17] War-wounded received reconstructive surgery, physiotherapy, and psychosocial support in 2017.[18]

The Paola Biocca Center, which opened in 2015, had treated 100 amputees by the end of 2017, many of whom were refugees.[19] In 2017, Jordan reported providing 20 prostheses free of charge.[20]

Socio-economic and psychosocial inclusion

The National Committee for Demining and Rehabilitation(NCDR) continued its economic reintegration project in collaboration with the Jordan Agricultural Credit Corporation.[21] In an effort to improve the standards of living of persons with disabilities, including mine/ERW survivors, Jordan provided monthly grants to persons with disabilities.[22]

Cross-cutting

There were more than 670,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan as of September 2018.[23] Since late 2014, access to health services for Syrian refugees is no longer free of charge, and specialized care for persons with disabilities can be very costly, preventing many of them from accessing appropriate care.[24]

The Sir Bobby Charlton Centre for Support and Rehabilitation, which opened in Amman in August 2017, aims to support and coordinate physical and mental rehabilitation for Syrian refugees.[25] Humanity & Inclusion (HI, formerly Handicap International) also provided physical rehabilitation and psychosocial services to Syrian refugees,[26] as did the ICRC[27] and MSF.[28] The Paola Biocca Center also provided physical rehabilitation services to refugees.[29]

Due to the uneven distribution of services throughout Jordan, persons with disabilities living in remote areas had little access to services.[30]

Victim assistance providers and activities

Name of organization

Type of activity

Government

Ministry of Health

Medical and rehabilitation services[31]

Ministry of Social Development

Referral of refugees,[32] rehabilitation,[33] economic support[34]

Ministry of Planning

Referral of refugees[35]

National Committee for Demining and Rehabilitation (NCDR)

Rehabilitation,[36] economic inclusion[37]

National

Asia Development Training (ADT)

Physical rehabilitation and mobility services[38]

International

Paola Biocca Center

Rehabilitation, prostheses and orthoses, social inclusion, peer support, rehabilitation training[39]

Sir Bobby Charlton Centre for Support and Rehabilitation, Amman

Physical rehabilitation, psychological support, training[40]

Humanity & Inclusion (HI)

Needs assessment and referral, physical rehabilitation and capacity-building, psychosocial support, provision of assistive devices, awareness raising for refugees, pilot testing Washington Group questionsWashington Group[41]

Polus Center

Physical rehabilitations, mobility devices, prosthetic and physical therapy training, and psychological support[42]

ICRC

Training, material and technical support, treatment of weapon-wounded people, medical supplies[43]

Médecins sans Frontières (MSF)

Emergency surgical care to war-wounded, physiotherapy, and psychosocial support[44]

 



[1] National Committee for Demining and Rehabilitation(NCDR), “2015–2020 NCDR National Plan,” Amman, undated, p. 20.

[2] Ibid.; and interview with Mohammed Breikat and Awni Ayasreh, NCDR, Amman, 28 May 2010.

[3] NCDR, “2015–2020 NCDR National Plan,” Amman, undated.

[4] Interview with Mohammed Breikat and Awni Ayasreh, NCDR, Amman, 28 May 2010.

[5] Email from Adnan Telfah, NCDR, 12 June 2012; and Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2017), Form G.

[6] Email from Adnan Telfah, NCDR, June 2012; casualty data and statistics for the period 2000 to 2013 provided by Adnan Telfah, NCDR, 10 March 2014; and NCDR, “2015–2020 NCDR National Plan,” Amman, undated, p. 19.

[8] United States (US) Department of State, “Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2017: Jordan,” Washington, DC, 20 April 2018, p. 35.

[10] Ibid.

[11] Statement of Jordan, Mine Ban Treaty Sixteenth Meeting of States Parties, Vienna, 19 December 2017; and Camille Dupire, “Jordan’s law on rights of people with disability recognised at global summit,” The Jordan Times, 2 August 2018.

[12] Lexology, “Accessibility: Disability and the Law,” 30 October 2017; and Laila Azzeh, “New law on disability opens ‘new era’ for country—official,” The Jordan Times, 9 June 2017.

[14] Statement of Jordan, Mine Ban Treaty Sixteenth Meeting of States Parties, Vienna, 19 December 2017; and HI, “Jordan Country Card,” October 2017, p. 1.

[15] ICRC, “Annual Report 2017,” Geneva, June 2018, p. 477; and ICRC, “Jordan: Facts and Figures,” Amman, March 2018, p. 1.

[16] ICRC, “Annual Report 2017,” Geneva, June 2018, p. 477; and ICRC, “Jordan: Facts and Figures,” Amman, March 2018, p. 3.

[18] Ibid.

[19] Paola Biocca Center, “Paola Biocca Rehabilitation Center: 2017,” undated, p. 6.

[20] Statement of Jordan, Mine Ban Treaty Sixteenth Meeting of States Parties, Vienna, 19 December 2017.

[22] Statement of Jordan, Mine Ban Treaty Sixteenth Meeting of States Parties, Vienna, 19 December 2017.

[23] United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), “Syria Regional Refugee Response: Jordan,” 24 September 2018.

[24] HI and iMMAP, “Removing Barriers: the Path towards Inclusive Access,” Amman, July 2018, p. 23.

[25]Centre for landmine blast survivors opens in Amman,” The Jordan Times, 23 August 2017.

[26] HI, “Jordan Country Card,” October 2017, p. 2.

[27] ICRC, “Annual Report 2017,” Geneva, June 2018, p. 477.

[28] MSF, “International Activity Report 2017,” Geneva, undated, p. 55.

[29] Paola Biocca Center, “Paola Biocca Rehabilitation Center: 2017,” undated, p. 6.

[30] HI, “Jordan Country Card,” October 2017, p. 1.

[31] Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2017), Form G.

[32] Paola Biocca Center, “Paola Biocca Rehabilitation Center: 2017,” undated.

[33] Ana V. Ibáñez Prieto, “Ministry to draft 10-year plan to improve lives of people with disabilities,” The Jordan Times, 24 May 2018.

[34] Ana V. Ibáñez Prieto, “Ministry to draft 10-year plan to improve lives of people with disabilities,” The Jordan Times, 24 May 2018.

[35] Paola Biocca Center, “Paola Biocca Rehabilitation Center: 2017,” undated.

[36] Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2017), Form G.

[37] NCDR, “تجديد اتفاقية صندوق الاقراض الزراعي” (“Renewal of the Agricultural Credit Fund Agreement”), 4 February 2018.

[38] Noor al-Saleh, “Des enfants syriens trouvent l'espoir dans un centre de réhabilitation d'Amman” (“Syrian children find hope at a rehabilitation center in Amman”), Al-Mashareq, 15 January 2018.

[39] Paola Biocca Center, “Paola Biocca Rehabilitation Center: 2017,” undated.

[40]Centre for landmine blast survivors opens in Amman,” The Jordan Times, 23 August 2017.

[41] HI, “Jordan Country Card,” October 2017, p. 2.

[42] Polus Center for Social and Economic Development, “Jordan,” undated.

[43] ICRC, “Annual Report 2017,” Geneva, June 2018, p. 477.