Afghanistan

Support for Mine Action

Last updated: 18 December 2019

In 2018, the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan received nearly US$72 million from 15 donors, an increase of 70% compared to 2017 (almost $30 million more).[1]

The United Kingdom (UK) provided the largest contribution with $20.8 million to clearance and risk education activities, which represents 30% of the total international mine action assistance in Afghanistan for 2018.

Of the total contribution, nearly three-quarters ($51.6 million or 72%) went toward clearance and risk education activities, 8% ($5.8 million) was for victim assistance, and the remainder ($14.3 million or 20%) went to capacity-building other mine action activities that were not disaggregated

Funding to victim assistance more than doubled in 2018 (from $2.8 million in 2017 to $5.8 million in 2018). This is largely the result of higher contributions within the context of emergency/post-conflict operations. In 2018, victim assistance came from five donors: Germany ($4.1 million), Japan ($0.7 million), Italy ($0.6 million), the European Union (EU) ($0.2 million), and Norway ($0.2 million).

The Mine Action Programme of Afghanistan (MAPA) is largely funded through international assistance, although in the past, the government of Afghanistan has reported contributing to some specific projects. For instance, in 2015, the government of Afghanistan contributed $1.5 million for clearance operations in Logar province, while in 2013, Afghanistan contributed $2.6 million for clearance of the Aynak copper mine.[2] No information on any national contribution was available for 2018, 2017, 2016, or 2014.

International contributions: 2018[3]

Donor

Sector

Amount (national currency)

Amount (US$)

UK

Clearance and risk education

£15,578,603

20,817,687

United States (US)

Clearance and risk education

$20,000,000

20,000,000

Germany

Clearance and victim assistance

€7,000,000

8,271,900

Netherlands

Various

€5,101,413

6,028,340

OCHA

Various

$4,755,852

4,755,852

Japan

Various

¥379,700,045

3,439,312

Canada

Various

C$3,000,000

2,508,991

Sweden

Various

SEK15,295,000

1,759,158

Norway

Clearance, risk education and victim assistance

NOK11,366,000

1,397,723

Denmark

Clearance and risk education

DKK8,000,000

1,267,206

Italy

Victim assistance

€500,000

590,850

Ireland

Clearance and risk education

€300,000

354,510

Australia

Clearance

AU$410,000

306,721

EU

Victim assistance

€203,243

240,172

Slovenia

Capacity-building

€29,536

34,903

Total

   

71,773,325

 

Since 2014, Afghanistan has received more than $260 million in international assistance for mine action. Between 2010–2014, a downward trend had been apparent with a continuous decline in international assistance that dropped from $102 million in 2010 to less than $50 million in 2014.

Summary of contributions: 2014–2018[4]

Year

Amount (US$)

% change from previous year ($)

2018

71,773,325

+70

2017

42,320,790

-26

2016

57,257,467

+11

2015

51,689,045

+18

2014

43,973,822

-34

Total

267,014,449

 

 



[1] Australia, Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report, Form J, February 2019; Canada, Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report, Form J, 30 April 2019; and Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report, Form I, April 2019. Response to Monitor questionnaire by Natascha Hassan Johns, Head of Section, Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 1 October 2019; response to Monitor questionnaire by Frank Meeussen, Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Arms Export Control, European External Action Service, 30 September 2019; Germany, Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report, Form J, 4 April 2019; Ireland, Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report, Annex, 2 April 2019; and Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report, April 2019; Italy, Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report, Form I, March 2019; and Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report, Form J, April 2019; ITF Enhancing Human Security, “Annual Report 2018,” March 2019, p. 23; Japan, Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report, Form I, 30 April 2019; Netherlands, Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report, Form J, April 2019; Norway, Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report, Annex, 30 April 2019; Sweden, Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report, Form I, 25 April 2019; UNMAS, “Annual Report 2017,” March 2018, pp. 22–23; UK, Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report, Form J, 30 April 2019; US Department of State, “To walk the earth in safety 2019,” 3 April 2019.

[2] MACCA, “MAPA Annual Report 1394,” September 2016, pp. 40–41; and MACCA, “Fast Facts: Mine Action Coordination Centre of Afghanistan,” December 2013.

[3] Average exchange rate for 2018: A$1=US$0.7481; C$1.1957=US$1; DKK6.3131 =US$1; €1=US$1.1817; ¥110.4=US$1; NOK8.1318=US$1; £1=US$1.3363; SEK8.6945=US$1. US Federal Reserve, “List of Exchange Rates (Annual),” 2 January 2019.

[4] See previous Monitor reports. The total for international support in 2017 has been rectified as a result of revised US funding totals.