Tuvalu

Cluster Munition Ban Policy

Last updated: 13 September 2021

Summary

Non-signatory Tuvalu has never commented on the humanitarian concerns raised by cluster munitions or elaborated its position on joining the convention. Tuvalu voted in favour of a key United Nations (UN) resolution promoting the convention in December 2020.

Tuvalu is not known to have ever used, produced, transferred, or stockpiled cluster munitions.

Policy

Tuvalu has not yet acceded to the Convention on Cluster Munitions.

Tuvalu has never commented on the humanitarian concerns raised by cluster munitions or elaborated its position on joining the convention.[1]

Tuvalu did not participate in the Oslo Process that created the convention.

Tuvalu has never attended a meeting of the convention, but it has participated in regional workshops on the convention, most recently one hosted by the Philippines, in Manila in June 2019.[2] Tuvalu attended a regional conference in Auckland, New Zealand in February 2018, which issued a declaration affirming “the clear moral and humanitarian rationale for joining” the Convention on Cluster Munitions.[3]

In December 2020, Tuvalu voted in favor of a UN General Assembly (UNGA) resolution urging states outside the Convention on Cluster Munitions to “join as soon as possible.”[4] It has voted in favor of the annual UNGA resolution promoting the convention since it was first introduced in 2015.

Tuvalu has also voted in favor of UNGA resolutions expressing outrage at the use of cluster munitions in Syria, most recently in December 2020.[5]

Tuvalu is a State Party to the Mine Ban Treaty. It is not party to the Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW).

Use, production, transfer, and stockpiling

Tuvalu is not known to have ever used, produced, transferred, or stockpiled cluster munitions.



[1] Officials have indicated that Tuvalu is interested in the convention but faces resources challenges in undertaking the accession process. Cluster Munition Coalition (CMC) meeting with Sunema Simati, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of Tuvalu to the UN in New York, Geneva, 24 August 2016.

[2]Asia-Pacific Workshop on CCM Universalization,” Convention on Cluster Munitions Quarterly Newsletter, April 2019.

[3] According to the declaration, during the meeting “some states not yet party to the Convention undertook to positively consider membership of it.” “Auckland Declaration on Conventional Weapons Treaties,” Pacific Conference on Conventional Weapons Treaties, Auckland, 12–14 February 2018.

[4]Implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions,” UNGA Resolution 75/62, 7 December 2020.

[5]Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic,” UNGA Resolution 75/193, 16 December 2020. Tuvalu voted in favor of similar resolutions from 2013–2019.


Mine Ban Policy

Last updated: 18 December 2019

Policy

Tuvalu acceded to the Mine Ban Treaty on 13 September 2011.

In early August 2011, the Mine Ban Treaty’s Implementation Support Unit (ISU) stated that Tuvalu could join the Mine Ban Treaty “in coming months.”[1] The announcement came after a three-day visit to Tuvalu by Prince Mired Raad Zeid Al-Hussein of Jordan, the Mine Ban Treaty’s Special Envoy on Universalization. Prince Mired met with Prime Minister Willy Telavi and other government representatives to discuss Tuvalu’s accession to the Mine Ban Treaty.[2]

In June 2011, Tuvalu participated in the intersessional Standing Committee meetings in Geneva, its first-ever participation in a meeting of the Mine Ban Treaty. A Ministry of Foreign Affairs official informed States Parties, “Tuvalu is here to listen and hopefully become a member in the near future” and expressed concern at the social, health, and economic problems caused by mines. The official said that, “a report will be made possible to our cabinet, once our position is finalized this will be then conveyed to your good office at the earliest.”[3] Tuvalu has not since participated in a meeting of the treaty. It was invited to, but did not attend, the Third Review Conference in Maputo in June 2014, and more recently the Seventeenth Meeting of States Parties in Geneva in November 2018.

Tuvalu has yet to submit its initial Article 7 transparency report, which was due on 28 August 2012.

Tuvalu is not party to the Convention on Conventional Weapons, nor is it party to the Convention on Cluster Munitions.

Use, production, transfer, and stockpile

Tuvalu has stated several times that it does not use, produce, import, or stockpile antipersonnel mines.[4]



[1] The Tuvalu visit took place on 2–4 August 2011. See, ISU, “Global movement to eradicate landmines poised to be strengthened thanks to commitments made in the South Pacific,” Press release, Suva, 5 August 2011.

[2] Prince Mired met with Governor General Sir Lakoba Taeia Italeli, Prime Minister Willy Telavi, and Minister of Foreign Affairs Apisai Lelemia. He also met with representatives of the Tuvalu Association of Non-Governmental Organizations and local media.

[3] Statement of Tuvalu, Standing Committee on the General Status and Operation of the Convention, Mine Ban Treaty, Geneva, 20 June 2011.

[4] Statement of Tuvalu, Standing Committee on the General Status and Operation of the Convention, Mine Ban Treaty, Geneva, 20 June 2011; and letter from Bill P. Teo, Secretary to Government, 15 April 2002.