Japan

Support for Mine Action

Last updated: 15 December 2023

In 2022, Japan contributed more than ¥5.9 billion (approximately US$45.3 million) in mine action funding to at least 19 countries, as well as to global activities.[1] In 2022, Japan was the fourth largest donor to mine action.

The largest contribution went to Cambodia, which received more than ¥2.6 billion ($20.1 million), representing 44% of Japan’s total funding.

Japan provided support to the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS), the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), as well as to non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and national partners. National partners were supported in Cambodia, Lao PDR, the Solomon Islands, and Ukraine, and received ¥2.9 million ($22.4 million, or 49% of the total). Japan also supported national NGOs in Angola and Sri Lanka.

In 2022, Japan contributed $10.3 million to clearance activities in 12 affected countries (23% of its total contribution). It allocated $7.8 million (or 17%) for victim assistance activities in five affected states, and $1.2 million (or 3%) for risk education activities in three affected states. Japan allocated $20.9 million (or 46%) to capacity-building projects in three affected states, with the majority of this funding ($18.6 million) for the construction of a training complex and outreach facility for the Cambodian Mine Action Center (CMAC). The remaining $5.2 million (or 11%) went to other “various” activities that were not disaggregated by sector.

Contributions by recipient: 2022[2]

Recipient

Sector*

Amount (¥)

Amount (US$)

Cambodia

Clearance, victim assistance

2,647,309,928

20,137,928

Ukraine

Victim assistance, various

671,783,904

5,110,220

Afghanistan

Clearance, capacity-building, risk education, victim assistance

367,200,000

2,793,268

Sri Lanka

Clearance, capacity-building

348,825,960

2,653,498

Lao PDR

Clearance (CMR), capacity-building

337,379,796

2,566,428

Syria

Victim assistance, risk education

324,000,000

2,464,649

Myanmar

Victim assistance, risk education

299,584,000

2,278,918

Lebanon

Clearance, capacity-building

139,914,982

1,064,325

Libya

Risk education, victim assistance

135,000,000

1,026,937

Angola

Clearance, capacity-building

127,569,060

970,410

Palestine

Risk education, victim assistance

122,494,000

931,805

Palau

Clearance (ERW)

94,671,396

720,160

Solomon Islands

Clearance (ERW)

85,084,020

647,229

Zimbabwe

Clearance, capacity-building

71,876,484

546,760

Vietnam

Clearance (CMR)

69,999,984

532,486

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Clearance, capacity-building

47,087,150

358,189

Benin

Capacity-building (clearance and risk education)

22,665,420

172,414

Ethiopia

Risk education, victim assistance

21,600,000

164,310

Global

Various (ICRC and UNMAS)

18,011,808

137,015

Azerbaijan

Clearance equipment

9,528,192

72,480

Total

 -

5,961,586,084

45,349,429

Note: CMR=cluster munition remnants; ERW=explosive remnants of war.

*Where not specified as CMR or ERW clearance, funding was primarily for mine clearance.

Mine action assistance approach

In May 2021, at a meeting of the Mine Action Support Group, Japan stated that its mine action assistance policy was threefold: providing support to seriously-affected countries; promoting South-South and regional approaches; and supporting landmine victims.[3]

Japan regularly notes the importance of providing “comprehensive and sustainable assistance” to mine victims and survivors to “overcome the damages they [have] suffered and restore their livelihood[s].”[4]

At the Annual Pledging Conference of the Mine Ban Treaty, held in Geneva in February 2020, Japan said that its mine action support was not only focused on “mine clearance, but also on diverse domains including risk education, [and the] construction of schools and revitalization of economic activities, in order to promote stability and development.”[5]

Five-year support to mine action

From 2018–2022, Japan contributed ¥23 billion ($201.5 million) to mine action activities. This represents a 20% increase in national currency terms on its total contribution in the previous five-year period, from 2013–2017, when Japan provided ¥19.2 billion in support. However, after conversion into United States (US) dollar terms, this represents a decrease of 14%. The decrease in the value of the yen has had an impact on the US dollar valuation of Japan’s contributions to mine action, as illustrated in the table below.

Summary of contributions: 2018–2022[6]

Year

Amount (¥)

% change from previous year (¥)

Amount (US$)

% change from previous year (US$)

2022

5,961,586,084

+28

45,349,429

+7

2021

4,647,063,267

+9

42,306,451

+6

2020

4,254,575,562

+6

39,846,027

+8

2019

4,016,120,732

-2

36,838,385

-1

2018

4,104,891,588

+13

37,181,989

+15

Total

22,984,237,233

N/A

201,522,281

N/A

Note: N/A=not applicable.

 


[1] Average exchange rate for 2022: ¥131.4589=US$1. United States (US) Federal Reserve, “List of Exchange Rates (Annual),” 9 January 2023.

[2] Response to Monitor questionnaire by Akifumi Fukuoka, Deputy Director, Conventional Arms Division, Japan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 7 September 2023.

[3] Mine Action Support Group Meeting, held virtually, Minutes, 28 May 2021.

[4] Statement of Japan, Sixth Annual Pledging Conference for the Implementation of the Mine Ban Treaty, held virtually, 23 February 2021; and statement of Japan, Third Annual Pledging Conference for the Implementation of the Mine Ban Treaty, Geneva, 27 February 2018.

[5] Statement of Japan, Fifth Annual Pledging Conference for the Implementation of the Mine Ban Treaty, Geneva, 25 February 2020.

[6] See previous Support for Mine Action country profiles. ICBL-CMC, “Country Profiles: Japan,” undated.