Libya

Support for Mine Action

Last updated: 22 December 2023

In 2022, Libya received a total of US$17.5 million in international assistance to mine action from 10 donors. This represents a 75% increase from the $10 million received in 2021.[1]

The European Union (EU) provided the largest contribution, totaling $11 million for capacity-building and clearance activities. The funds from the EU represented 63% of total international mine action assistance to Libya in 2022.

International contributions: 2022[2]

Donor

Sector

Amount

(national currency)

Amount

(US$)

European Union

Capacity-building, clearance

€10,500,000

11,060,700

United States

Capacity-building, clearance, risk education

US$2,000,000

2,000,000

United Kingdom

Clearance, risk education

£1,064,853

1,317,330

France

Capacity-building, clearance, risk education

€1,060,000

1,116,604

Japan

Risk education, victim assistance

¥2,000,000

1,026,937

Denmark

Clearance, risk education

DKK1,317,330

565,083

Germany

Capacity-building, clearance

€160,000

168,544

Luxembourg

Risk education

€1,116,604

119,561

Norway

Risk education, victim assistance

NOK565,083

104,017

Spain

Capacity-building, risk education

€1,026,937

42,560

Total

 -

N/A

17,521,336

Note: N/A=not applicable.

Five-year support for mine action

In the five-year period from 2018–2022, Libya received more than $93 million in international assistance for mine action.

Annual funding increased from less than $7 million in 2015 to more than $20 million each year in 2017–2019, but has remained below $18 million since 2020.

Summary of international contributions: 2018–2022[3]

Year

International contributions (US$)

% change from previous year

2022

17,521,336

+75

2021

10,000,000

-31

2020

14,500,000

-40

2019

24,098,699

-12

2018

27,478,854

+6

Total

93,598,889

N/A

                                                    Note: N/A=not applicable.

 


[1] Denmark: response to Monitor questionnaire by Uffe Troensgaard, Head of Section, Denmark Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ministry of Defence, 29 September 2023. European Union: response to Monitor questionnaire by Michal Adamowicz, Policy Officer, Non-Proliferation and Arms Export Control, European External Action Service (EEAS), 28 September 2023. France: response to Monitor questionnaire by Yves Marek, Ambassador for Mine Clearance, France Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs, 21 September 2023. Germany: Germany Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form I; and Germany Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form J. Japan: response to Monitor questionnaire by Akifumi Fukuoka, Deputy Director, Conventional Arms Division, Japan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 7 September 2023. Luxembourg: response to Monitor questionnaire by Dario Hoffman, Security Policy Desk, Luxembourg Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, 31 May 2023. Norway: Norway Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form J. Spain: United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS), “Annual Report 2022,” April 2023, pp. 119–120. United Kingdom: Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form J. United States: US Department of State, Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (PM/WRA), “To Walk the Earth in Safety: 1 October 2021–30 September 2022,” 4 April 2023. For Article 7 reports, see Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Database and Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Database.

[2] Average exchange rates for 2022: €1=US$1.0534; DKK7.0786=US$1; £1.2371=US$1; NOK9.6138=US$1; ¥131.4589=US$1. US Federal Reserve, “List of Exchange Rates (Annual),” 9 January 2023.

[3] See previous Support for Mine Action country profiles. ICBL-CMC, “Country Profiles: Libya,” undated; ICBL, Landmine Monitor 2022 (ICBL-CMC: Geneva, November 2022); and ICBL, Landmine Monitor 2021 (ICBL-CMC: Geneva, November 2021).