Syria

Support for Mine Action

Last updated: 09 January 2024

In 2022, Syria received a total of US$33.7 million in international mine action assistance from 14 donors.[1] This represents an increase of 39% from the $24.2 million received in 2021. Syria was the eighth largest recipient of international support to mine action in 2022.

The European Union (EU) provided the largest contribution, totaling $9.3 million, to support activities implemented by the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS), DanChurchAid (DCA), Information Management and Mine Action Programs (iMMAP), and Mines Advisory Group (MAG). The EU contribution represented 28% of total international mine action support for Syria in 2022. In addition, the United States (US) provided a substantial contribution of $7 million; while Germany, Norway, and Austria each provided more than $3million.

International contributions: 2022[2]

Donor

Sector

Amount

(national currency)

Amount

(US$)

European Union

Capacity-building, clearance, coordination

€8,820,000

9,290,988

United States

Various

US$7,000,000

7,000,000

Germany

Clearance, risk education, victim assistance

€3,802,000

4,005,027

Norway

Clearance, risk education, victim assistance

NOK35,107,939

3,651,827

Austria

Clearance, risk education

€3,000,000

3,160,200

Japan

Risk education, victim assistance

¥324,000,000

2,464,649

Belgium

Clearance, risk education, victim assistance

€1,250,000

1,316,750

Italy

Clearance, risk education

€1,000,000

1,053,400

Switzerland

Risk education, victim assistance

CHF641,440

671,665

France

Capacity-building, clearance, risk education

€408,000

429,787

Luxembourg

Clearance, risk education, victim assistance

€250,000

263,350

Slovenia

Clearance

N/R

189,338

Denmark

Risk education

DKK1,050,000

148,334

Finland

Capacity-building, risk education, victim assistance

€50,000

52,670

Total

 -

N/A

33,697,985

Note: N/A=not applicable; N/R=not reported.

Five-year support for mine action

In the five-year period from 2018–2022, international contributions to mine action activities in Syria totaled approximately $193.2 million. Contributions declined for three consecutive years from 2019–2021 after a high of $66.7 million in 2018, before rising again in 2022.

The total for 2018–2022 represents an increase of 55% on international contributions received during the previous five-year period, from 2013–2017.

Summary of international contributions: 2018–2022[3]

Year

International contributions (US$)

% change from previous year

2022

33,697,985

+39

2021

24,200,000

-7

2020

26,100,000

-39

2019

42,529,814

-36

2018

66,679,122

-28

Total

193,206,921

N/A

          Note: N/A=not applicable.



[1] Austria: Austria Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form J. Belgium: Belgium Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form I. Denmark: response to Monitor questionnaire by Uffe Troensegaard, Head of Section, Denmark Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 29 September 2023. European Union: response to Monitor questionnaire by Michal Adamowicz, Policy Officer, Conventional Arms Export Control, European External Action Service (EEAS), 28 September 2023. Finland: response to Monitor questionnaire by Unit for Arms Control, Finland Ministry for Foreign Affairs, 1 September 2023. France: response to Monitor questionnaire by Yves Marek, Ambassador for Mine Clearance, France Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs, 21 September 2023. Germany: Germany Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form J. Italy: Italy Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form I. Japan: response to Monitor questionnaire by Akifumi Fukuoka, Deputy Director, Conventional Arms Division, Japan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 7 September 2023. Luxembourg: response to Monitor questionnaire by Dario Hoffman, Security Policy Desk, Luxembourg Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs, 31 May 2023. Norway: Norway Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), Form J. Slovenia: response to Monitor questionnaire by Albin Keuc and Boštjan Jerman, Counsellor and Minister Plenipotentiary, Slovenia Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 2 October 2023; and ITF Enhancing Human Security, “Annual Report 2022,” March 2023, pp. 20–21. Switzerland: Switzerland Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Report (for calendar year 2022), form I. United States: US Department of State, Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement (PM/WRA), “To Walk the Earth in Safety: 1 October 2021–30 September 2022,” 4 April 2023. For Article 7 reports, see Mine Ban Treaty Article 7 Database and Convention on Cluster Munitions Article 7 Database.

[2] Average exchange rates for 2022: €1=US$1.0534; CHF0.9550=US$1; DKK7.0786=US$1; NOK9.6138=US$1; ¥131.4589=US$1. US Federal Reserve, “List of Exchange Rates (Annual),” 9 January 2023.

[3] See previous Support for Mine Action country profiles. ICBL-CMC, “Country Profiles: Syria,” undated; ICBL, Landmine Monitor 2022 (ICBL-CMC: Geneva, November 2022); and ICBL, Landmine Monitor 2021 (ICBL-CMC: Geneva, November 2021).